Comments for Called to Communion http://www.calledtocommunion.com Reformation meets Rome Tue, 18 Dec 2018 14:43:26 +0000 hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.9.9 Comment on Clark, Frame, and the Analogy of Painting a Magisterial Target Around One’s Interpretive Arrow by Bryan Cross /2014/01/clark-frame-and-the-analogy-of-painting-a-magisterial-target-around-ones-interpretive-arrow/#comment-409404 Tue, 18 Dec 2018 14:43:26 +0000 /?p=15976#comment-409404 The ordinary way to describe the Texas sharpshooter fallacy is by way of the example of painting the target around one’s already fired projectiles. Another is by moving the target to match the trajectory of the incoming projectile:

]]> Comment on Lawrence Feingold on Purgatory by Bryan Cross /2015/03/lawrence-feingold-on-purgatory/#comment-406753 Sun, 16 Dec 2018 14:23:18 +0000 /?p=18117#comment-406753 Purgatory – Good News for Most of Us,” a talk by Dr. Michael Root (CUA), given on October 2nd, 2018 at George Mason University.

Speaker Bio:
Michael Root is a native of Norfolk, Virginia. He studied at Dartmouth College (BA, summa cum laude) and Yale University (PhD. in theology). He has taught at Davidson College, Trinity Lutheran Seminary, and Lutheran Theological Southern Seminary. For ten years, he was Research Professor at the Institute for Ecumenical Research in Strasbourg, France.

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Comment on The Bishops of History and the Catholic Faith: A Reply To Brandon Addison by John Thayer Jensen /2014/06/the-bishops-of-history-and-the-catholic-faith-a-reply-to-brandon-addison/#comment-402246 Tue, 11 Dec 2018 20:12:12 +0000 /?p=16580#comment-402246 It’s worth noting, as Newman says in his <a href="http://www.newmanreader.org/works/development/&quot;Essay on the Development of Christian Doctrine that from the start, even fundamental truths like the Trinity and the Hypostatic Union took time to understand and appreciate. The development of doctrine implies the deeper understanding of what is implicit in a truth. It does not imply any external modification of that truth. The analogy is with the growth of an organism from its seed, not the growth of a building by its makers. This understanding helped me very much in becoming a Catholic.

jj

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Comment on The Bishops of History and the Catholic Faith: A Reply To Brandon Addison by Bryan Cross /2014/06/the-bishops-of-history-and-the-catholic-faith-a-reply-to-brandon-addison/#comment-402157 Tue, 11 Dec 2018 17:57:44 +0000 /?p=16580#comment-402157 Hello Federico (re: #164)

Does the Catholic view on the papacy require that this primacy was exercised fully from the beginning? Or is there place for development?

These are two separate questions, whether the primacy was exercised fully from the beginning, and whether there was place for development, because the answer to the latter does not determine the answer to the former. Of course there was room for development in the Church’s understanding of the meaning and implications of Christ’s gift of the keys to St. Peter. This gift was present in the Church from the beginning, such that the Church was never without it. But the gift itself does not require or entail that St. Peter or his immediate episcopal successors made full use of the authority given to them by Christ.

Likewise, regarding recognition from the universal church. Does the Catholic position on the papacy require that the pope’s authority was recognized fully from the beginning? Could it be the case that this recognition began with some idea about Peter and his successors’ authority, but as time passed this authority was fully recognized?

What is defined in the dogmas we refer to in the beginning of the article above is not epistemic on the part of St. Peter and his successors. Obviously St. Peter and the other Apostles knew that Christ gave the keys uniquely to St. Peter and designated him as the rock on which Christ would build His Church. But that does not mean that St. Peter or the other Apostles (or the rest of the Church) fully understood the meaning and implication of Christ’s giving the keys to St. Peter and making him the rock on which the Church is built. This growth in understanding is part of authentic development of doctrine, as Bl. Newman describes. At the same time, given that they knew that God is not a God of disorder, and that even nature teaches us that order of a visible body requires a singular visible head, it seems reasonable to believe at least that the Holy Spirit showed to the Apostles that by giving the keys uniquely to St. Peter, Christ was giving to him a role of leadership among the Apostles, and that this role would continue in the successors of the Apostles. So the early deferential attitudes we see toward the Church in Rome (say in St. Ignatius, St. Irenaeus, St. Cyprian) can be seen as expressions of and continued development of that early knowledge handed down from the Apostles.

In the peace of Christ,

– Bryan

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Comment on On Denying the Gospel for the Sake of God’s Glory by SS /2018/07/on-denying-the-gospel-for-the-sake-of-gods-glory/#comment-401373 Tue, 11 Dec 2018 00:35:45 +0000 /?p=19486#comment-401373

That the works done *in grace* after initial justification *merit* eternal life in the modus of condign does not contradict the pure gift-quality that Pope Francis teaches is shown hereby: That God is obligated to reward those with such works with eternal life is a fact when considering the works themselves, not the principle of production.

Erick,

Can you show me where in the catechism/official teaching one can find the above, re the idea of condign merit in regards to eternal life (not initial justification)? The 2008 version says this:

2008 The merit of man before God in the Christian life arises from the fact that God has freely chosen to associate man with the work of his grace. the fatherly action of God is first on his own initiative, and then follows man’s free acting through his collaboration, so that the merit of good works is to be attributed in the first place to the grace of God, then to the faithful. Man’s merit, moreover, itself is due to God, for his good actions proceed in Christ, from the predispositions and assistance given by the Holy Spirit.

There is no mention of ‘condign’ in the above, so where are you (Mark and yourself) getting the idea of condignity for your views?

Secondly and more importantly, it attributes merit not only to God but also to the faithful

But Pope Francis said nothing human can merit divine grace (presumably including eternal life).

How is the above not contradictory?

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Comment on St. Thomas Aquinas on Assurance of Salvation by Andrew Preslar /2009/08/st-thomas-aquinas-on-assurance-of-salvation/#comment-399783 Sun, 09 Dec 2018 16:37:01 +0000 /?p=1214#comment-399783 Taylor,

In the articles cited at the beginning of this post, Thomas explicitly affirms certainty of salvation; specifically, he affirms the certainty of hope with respect to eternal happiness. You also, in your comment, affirm certainty of salvation in the form of moral certainty. Contrasting this with absolute certainty does not nullify the affirmation. Whether or not I have in some way misrepresented Thomas’s articles on the certainty of hope is a further question, as is the relation between the certainty of hope and other kinds of certainty. If I am mistaken on any of these matters I would be glad of correction, with specific reference to his texts and my arguments in this article.

All the best,

Andrew

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Comment on St. Thomas Aquinas on Assurance of Salvation by Taylor Barrett /2009/08/st-thomas-aquinas-on-assurance-of-salvation/#comment-394943 Wed, 05 Dec 2018 20:59:35 +0000 /?p=1214#comment-394943 Andrew, I think you have misrepresented St. Thomas on this point. He does not teach certainty of salvation, but certainty that God will give the grace necessary for salvation. And there is a big difference. Without the proper disposition, those graces we can be certain God will give will be of no effect. Thus, the highest certainty we can have of both present grace and future salvation is at the very most moral certainty. Because according to Catholic dogma, we can never be absolutely certain we have met the criteria for imperfect contrition.

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Comment on The Bishops of History and the Catholic Faith: A Reply To Brandon Addison by Federico Alvarez /2014/06/the-bishops-of-history-and-the-catholic-faith-a-reply-to-brandon-addison/#comment-379201 Fri, 23 Nov 2018 00:27:17 +0000 /?p=16580#comment-379201 Bryan,

I have some questions regarding the Catholic conception of the papacy, and how papal authority exercised seen at the beginning.

Let us assume that “a primacy of jurisdiction over the whole Church of God was immediately and directly promised to the blessed apostle Peter and conferred on him by Christ the lord.” Let us also assume that Christ intended Peter to have successors perpetually until Christ’s return.

Does the Catholic view on the papacy require that this primacy was exercised fully from the beginning? Or is there place for development?

Likewise, regarding recognition from the universal church. Does the Catholic position on the papacy require that the pope’s authority was recognized fully from the beginning? Could it be the case that this recognition began with some idea about Peter and his successors’ authority, but as time passed this authority was fully recognized?

God bless,

Federico

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Comment on On Denying the Gospel for the Sake of God’s Glory by Erick T Ybarra /2018/07/on-denying-the-gospel-for-the-sake-of-gods-glory/#comment-357880 Sun, 04 Nov 2018 14:34:07 +0000 /?p=19486#comment-357880 SS,

That the works done *in grace* after initial justification *merit* eternal life in the modus of condign does not contradict the pure gift-quality that Pope Francis teaches is shown hereby: That God is obligated to reward those with such works with eternal life is a fact when considering the works themselves, not the principle of production. In other words, if good works are truly *good* works, then God’s *good* character obliges that it is met with justice (i.e. to render what is due). However, when considering the question how those works came into production, now we are talking about the human being operating under the divine operation of grace which can infallibly influence the will towards the good, all not by virtue of human nature but the impetus of the Holy Spirit. Another way to see this is that God rewards his own good works wrought in human persons at the day of judgment.

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Comment on Contraception and the Reformed Faith by Maria R. /2010/07/contraception/#comment-344628 Wed, 24 Oct 2018 08:12:39 +0000 /?p=5346#comment-344628 David,
I truly pitty you. You have been hoodwinked into believing false doctrine. The Christian theologians you and the article refer to CONTRADICTED, not added to, the word of Jesus Christ.
I cannot support these ersatz “Christians.”

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